Here’s why Georgia’s Senate runoff races are still too early to call

Two U.S. Senate runoff elections in Georgia that will determine which party controls the legislative chamber for the next two years remained too early to call late Tuesday, with the four candidates locked in tight contests and many ballots left to be tabulated.

Georgia has become a political focal point since the Nov. 3 general election, when none of the candidates in the state’s two Senate contests earned more than 50 per cent of the vote. That forced both races to a Jan. 5 runoff.

Read more: Georgia Senate runoffs offer clues about post-Trump politics

Republican David Perdue is facing Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff as he seeks a second term. Meanwhile, appointed GOP Sen. Kelly Loeffler is running against Democrat Raphael Warnock to complete the remainder of retired Republican Sen. Johnny Isakson’s term.

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Around 9:30 p.m. on Tuesday, the candidates in each contest were neck and neck in the counted vote. Much of vote favouring Democrats came from ballots cast before Election Day, while Republicans were performing well with ballots cast the day of the election.

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Additionally, there was a large number of outstanding ballots left to be counted in Democratic-leaning and population-dense counties around Atlanta.

The outcomes of the two races will help determine the country’s political trajectory over the next two years. If Democrats win both, they will have a 50-50 seat split with Republicans in the Senate with Vice-President-elect Kamala Harris poised to cast tie-breaking votes.

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